Our Next Meeting

2022 Annual Meeting of the Hannah Arendt Circle


March 24–26, 2022


Hosted by Loyola University Chicago

With support from the Department of Philosophy


Executive Committee:

Lucy Benjamin, University of Melbourne

Jennifer Gaffney, Loyola University Chicago

Katherine Brichacek, Northwestern University



General Information


Conference Format: There will be two special evening sessions on Thursday, March 24 and the main conference will take place on Friday, March 25 and Saturday, March 26. We will be using a hybrid, synchronous format for the special sessions and the main conference. For participants attending the conference in person, all sessions, including virtual sessions, will take place in the 4th floor multipurpose room of the Information Commons Building at Loyola University Chicago (see campus map). For those presenting and attending virtually, you will be able to participate in both live and virtual sessions. Please use the links included below to join the meeting virtually and note that there is a different Zoom link for each day of the conference.


Instructions for Accessing the Conference Room:


In-Person Presenters and Moderators: Your names have been added to a list of attendees who have permission to access the 4th floor multipurpose room in the Information Commons Building. When you enter the building, there will be gates that you will not be able to get through without a Loyola ID. Please tell the front desk that you will be attending the Arendt Circle conference on the 4th floor, and they will let you in. Unlike other visitors, you should not need a vaccine card or valid ID to enter the building, but it is a good idea to bring these just in case. You can then take the elevators to the 4th floor and you will see the conference room just as you get off the elevators.


Loyola Faculty and Students: You do not need anything other than your Loyola ID to access the 4th floor multipurpose room, and you are welcome to attend any part of the conference. Normally, the elevators to the 4th floor are locked, but they will be unlocked during the conference. If there are any problems with this, please contact Jennifer Gaffney at jgaffney@luc.edu.


All Other Attendees: Please contact Jennifer Gaffney at jgaffney@luc.edu. She will add you to the list of attendees. You can then follow the instructions above for in-person presenters and moderators to access the conference room.


Registration: The Arendt Circle does not have annual dues or registration fees, and anyone is welcome to attend. However, if you are not already on the conference program and not affiliated with Loyola, please email Jennifer Gaffney at jgaffney@luc.edu if you would like to attend.


Meals: Coffee and a light breakfast will be provided on Friday and Saturday morning for all in-person attendees. Presenters and moderators are invited to the conference dinner on Friday, and lunch will be provided at the business meeting on Saturday.



Thursday, March 24: Special Sessions


Zoom Link: email Jennifer Gaffney at jgaffney@luc.edu for Zoom link

In-Person Participants: All sessions, including virtual sessions, will be held on the Loyola University Chicago campus in the Information Commons 4th Floor Multipurpose Room


5:00pm–6:00pm CDT: Friendship and the Correspondence of Hannah Arendt: Forgiveness, Loyalty, and Authenticity

Presenters: Joy Harris & Julia Claire Wallace

In this presentation, Joy Harris and Julia Wallace will discuss their project, “Friendship and the Correspondence of Hannah Arendt: Forgiveness, Loyalty, and Authenticity.” Commissioned by Goethe Pop-up Houston, a branch of the Goethe Institute, this project is a 6-month creative residency that gives four artists the opportunity to critically engage with the work of Hannah Arendt. Relying primarily on Arendt’s correspondence, instead of her philosophical texts, Harris and Wallace aim to open up Arendt’s thinking to a broader audience and focus on the crucial role that friend making has on public life. Harris and Wallace will: (1) provide an overview of the project; (2) share examples of their curated content; and (3) open up a group discussion on friendship in the work of Arendt.

6.15pm–7.15pm CDT: Hannah Arendt and Political Theology: A Conversation with Miguel Vatter


Miguel Vatter is the author of Living Law: Jewish Political Theology from Hermann Cohen to Hannah Arendt (Oxford University Press, 2021). He will be joining us to discuss Arendt's relationship with political theology and the way in which a Jewish political theology in particular gives rise to a form of politics present in Arendt's argument of anarchic beginnings and republican conception of federalism.

7:30PM CDT: Informal Gathering at Cunneen’s, 1424 W Devon Ave, Chicago, IL 60626



Main Conference Program


Friday, March 25


Zoom Link: email Jennifer Gaffney at jgaffney@luc.edu for Zoom link

In-Person Participants: All sessions, including virtual sessions, will be held on the Loyola University Chicago campus in the Information Commons 4th Floor Multipurpose Room



8:30-8.45am: In-person participants meet at the Hampton Inn to walk to campus together


7am PST / 9am CDT / 10am EST / 3pm CET


Session 1: Origins (9:00-10:45am CDT): Moderator: Jennifer Gaffney


Tal Correm: Race, Guilt, and Political Responsibility: Hannah Arendt in the United States

Thomas Wittendorff (virtual) - Hannah Arendt’s Notion of Trespassing – a Political Concept of Guilt?



9am PST / 11am CDT / 12pm EST / 5pm CET

Session 2: Care for the World (11:00am-12:45am CDT) Moderator: Aliosha Bielenberg

Katy Fulfer and Rita A. Gardiner (virtual) - Caring for the World and Caring for Community

Rebeccah Leiby (virtual) - Political Compassion




LUNCH @ 12:45-2:15pm CDT



12.15pm PST / 2.15pm CDT / 3.15pm EST / 8.15pm CET

Session 3: Action (2:15-4pm) Moderator: Heather Slawny

Benjamin P Davis - The Right to Have Rights in the Americas: Arendt, Mariátegui, and the Problem of the State

Adi Burton - An-archical Ethics: Responsibility Before and After Politics


2.15pm PST / 4.15pm CDT / 5.15pm EST / 10.15pm CET

Session 4: Nature and Poetics (4:15-6:00pm CDT) Moderator: Italo Alves

Lydia Winn - Action’s Poetic Nature: Reading Arendt’s Human Condition in Light of Aristotle’s Poetics

Taylor Kloha - The Transformation of Nature: Arendt’s Political Ecology



Conference Dinner: 6:30pm CDT at Cookies and Carnitas, 5940 N Broadway, Chicago, IL 60660




Saturday, March 26


Zoom Link: email Jennifer Gaffney at jgaffney@luc.edu for Zoom link

In-Person Participants: All sessions, including virtual sessions, will be held on the Loyola University Chicago Campus in the Information Commons 4th Floor Multipurpose Room


7am PST / 9am CDT / 10am EST / 3pm CET


Session 1: Arendt’s Moral Affects (9:00-10:45am CDT) Moderator: Yasemin Sari


Micah Trautman (Virtual) - Arendtian Trust: The Recognitive Structure of Political Action

Maria Robaszkiewicz and Marieke Borren (Virtual) - The Spontaneity of Collective Action: Hannah Arendt Meets Rosa Luxemburg


9am PST / 11am CDT / 12pm EST / 5pm CET

Session 2: Historical Encounters (11:00am-12:45pm CDT) Moderator: Katherine Brichacek

Hanno Berger & Christian Pischel (Virtual) - Crystallizations of Understanding: Reconstructing Arendt’s “Totalitarianism” from Archival

Material

Eli B. Lichtenstein (Virtual) - Arendt, Hobbes, and the Concept of Sovereignty



LUNCH @ 12:45-2:15pm

Lunch will be provided at the business meeting


11am PST / 1pm CDT / 2pm EST / 7pm CET

BUSINESS MEETING (1:00pm CDT)


12.15pm PST / 2.15pm CDT / 3.15pm EST / 8.15pm CET


Session 3: Beginning and Decay (2:15-4pm CDT) Moderator: Gina Lebkuecher

James Barry - Hannah Arendt and the Winds of Progress: Writing the History of the Ruined World via Expropriation and Waste Economy

Hans Teerds - The Politics of New Beginnings: Architectural Design, Political Action, and the Notion of Care for the World




2.15pm PST / 4.15pm CST / 5.15pm EST / 10.15pm CET

Session 4: Encountering the World (4:15-6:00pm CDT) Moderator: Lucy Benjamin

Dana F Miranda - Wretched Spaces: Manichean Divisions in the Arendtian Republic

Magnus Ferguson - Wonder, Horror and Political Emotion in Arendt